Your resume is more than just a list of your previous jobs and experiences. Tailoring a resume to fit each different job you apply for can make a big impact on a potential employer.

Your resume should have a stated objective at the top, specific to the job you want. The objective should include a brief statement highlighting your qualifications for the job. For example, if you’re applying for a job as a staff assistant for Acme Company, your objective should read something like, “To secure a staff assistant position at Acme Company, drawing on solid office management skills.”

Like the objective, the job experience you list should pertain specifically to the job you are trying to get. Every job has multiple duties, and by placing more emphasis on the duties that are relevant to the position you’re seeking, you will come across as more qualified for the job. For example, if you’re considering a job as a sales clerk in a clothing store and one of the positions on your resume is a waitress job at a restaurant, don’t focus on the skills of waiting tables. Rather, focus on the people skills you honed at that job, such as “Interacted with customers to provide a pleasant dining experience,” or “Helped diners choose what to order by describing the food in a straightforward, descriptive manner.” These statements focus on your interactions with the customers. If you’re applying for a bartending job, you can frame that same experience in a different way, such as “Waited on multiple tables at the same time while ensuring all diners were satisfied with the service,” showing that you can multi-task and handle more than one order at a time.

If you have a great deal of experience in many different fields, it’s okay to leave some jobs off your resume as long as these omissions don’t leave a large gap of time that makes it appear that you were unemployed for that time. For example, if you worked as a teacher during the day and as a telemarketer at night, and you’re applying for a teaching job, you can leave the telemarketing job off since it’s irrelevant to teaching and won’t leave a time gap. The key is to provide your potential employer with as much relevant information as possible, without overloading the resume to the point where it’s watered down.

The main point to remember is that you want each potential employer to feel like you have really done your research and you know exactly what you want in a job. Tailor each resume to the specific employer, and you will find that you end up with more interviews and job offers than you would sending a general, vague resume to those employers.