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Author: Emma Holland Page 2 of 16

Investing in Mom Power

Stay-at-home moms might not have as much business experience to put on a resume as they would like, but they can list plenty of practical experience based on their work raising their children. A mom has to handle raising kids, keeping the house clean, cooking for the family, and all of the other little tasks that keep everyone’s life running smoothly day in and day out. When a mom is ready to get back out into the business world, she can use the work she has done at home to enhance her resume.

Specialized Skills

Being at home with the children gives a mom the opportunity to pursue interests that she might not have looked into if she were working full time away from home. A mom who spends several hours each day communicating through social networking websites can list that on a resume as computer literacy. She is probably also a fast and accurate typist, which can help with some potential jobs outside her home. Any special hobbies that a mom enjoys could translate into marketable skills depending on the kind of job she is looking for.

Expert at Multi-Tasking

A mother’s work is rarely linear. Most moms have to deal with several jobs at the same time. A mom who is looking for work could comfortably list multi-tasking as one of the many skills she has picked up by working in her house. If a mom can handle cooking dinner, helping with homework, talking on the phone, and keeping the dog out of the trash can all at the same time there is a good chance she can handle several phone lines at once when she is sitting at a busy desk.

Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work.

THOMAS EDISON

Communication and Negotiation Practice

An important part of being a parent is knowing how to say what needs to be said in such a way that it gets through to the kids. In a household with more than one child, negotiation skills are vital to keeping the peace. A mom develops good communication skills as soon as her child begins to talk. She continues to hone those skills as the child grows, with the greatest challenges coming as the kids reach their teenage years. It is perfectly fine to list those hard-won communication skills in a resume. Sometimes real-life experience is more complex than the negotiations that might come up in a business setting.

Home Organization Translates to the Workplace

A big part of being a mother is keeping track of everyone’s schedule. A mom has to make sure all the kids get to their appointments on time, the pantry is stocked appropriately, and so on. The organization skills that are necessary at home are the same organization skills needed in the workplace. A good resume should include the practical organization and attention to detail that a mother develops them as part of her everyday life. Employers are always looking for someone who can manage time efficiently and be productive. Being a mom is excellent training for the workplace.

The School Is an Attractive Employer for Students

College students who need to find work should begin by looking for a job on their school campus. There are hundreds of positions necessary to provide students with the services they need, and current students are some of the best resources for filling those positions. Make sure your resume highlights the number of semesters you have been a student at the school and how your degree program has given you special insight into the type of job you are applying for.

Work-Study Options

Most colleges and universities offer work specifically for students who demonstrate a financial need. These jobs usually pay a little better than minimum wage, but they can also offer special discounts on school-related items such as housing or textbooks. Since you have to be a student in order to qualify for these jobs, they are perfect for helping ends meet while you are attending classes. Talk to someone in your school’s administrative offices about the details of the jobs at your campus. There are generally a wide range of different positions available depending on your schedule and past work experience. Check on work study programs as early in the semester as possible because these jobs tend to be filled pretty quickly once school starts.

Students Already Spending Time at School

One of the reasons a student is a good fit for a school-related job is that students already spend the majority of their time on campus. A student worker has a better chance of reporting to work reliably and on time because there is very little travel involved in getting to the job location. Working at school is convenient for students because they do not have to burn any gasoline or spend extra time commuting to work when the work is already on campus.

A few areas in the university are still working hard but haven’t succeeded yet in getting enough qualified staff for students.

JERRY HOGLE

Familiarity with Campus is a Plus

Students make excellent school employees because they are already familiar with the school. Students know where all of the buildings are, and most students understand what each building’s purpose is. Current students are generally aware of the school’s administrative structure, which makes it easier for them to fit into the jobs that require a more intimate knowledge of how the school works. A student’s familiarity with the school is a definite benefit for the school employer, and it also helps the student acclimate to the new job more quickly than someone who has never been on campus.

Existing Relationships can Help

If a student has attended the school for more than one semester, there is a good chance that they already have some connections with administrative personnel on campus. A student can use past professors and other important relationships to build a good resume with powerful references. Since the references are people who already work for the school, the hiring process can be streamlined because the people doing the hiring will be familiar with the people listed as references on the student’s resume. Students who have a good reputation with instructors and other school officials will have an easier time finding work at the school.

New Year, New Career

There’s nothing better than the beginning of a new year to start fresh. Something about that blank slate of a new calendar opens up possibilities as we dream about what the next twelve months might bring.

One of the questions you may wrestle with is whether or not to take the leap into a new career. Maybe you’ve been bored for a long time now, having learned all you can or care to learn at your current job. Maybe you’re facing a layoff as you watch your once-thriving industry dwindle down to nothing. Or, maybe you’ve been taking stock and getting honest with yourself and realize that if you don’t start going for the career of your dreams, you’ll never forgive yourself.

It can be both scary and exciting to consider what else you might be doing with your days. What better time to take those steps toward a new career than now? There will always be obstacles in the way — from the opinions of our families, spouses, and friends, to financial commitments like mortgages and car notes, to our own fear of the unknown and disbelief in our abilities. It helps to remember that the perfect time will never come. It does not exist. Something will always be in the way. At no point will you find yourself with no competing possibilities, nagging doubts, or financial hurdles. A new year is as good an excuse as any to make needed changes in your life.

Making a big life change is pretty scary. But know what’s even scarier? Regret.

zig ziglar

But where to start? The idea of changing careers can seem overwhelming. It helps to break the process down into smaller steps. If you know what your ideal new career would be, take some time to do research. Start at square one. Will you need to go back to school? Could you find a part-time position in your new field that would give you some valuable experience? Are there skills you hope to use in your new venture that you can offer to others now on a freelance basis? Writing down some answers to these questions will help anchor your mind and give you some forward momentum.

If you don’t know what your new career might be, the new year is just as magical for sparking the imagination. Next year at this time, where would you like to be? Is there something you wanted to become as a child that still interests you now? Do you have a hobby, such as selling antiques, that you might be able to spin off into a full-time business? What kind of things do you enjoy doing for others? Is there anything they might pay you for? No matter how far-fetched or unrealistic your ideas might seem, they can help point you in a new, more fulfilling direction.

The only perfect time to start your new career is now. The beauty of a new year lets us set course with a clearer outlook and renewed intentions. If you’ve been looking for a sign, consider that this is it!

Pros and Cons of Open Office

Downloading Open Office to your computer can save you at least a hundred dollars on purchasing Microsoft Office. It could save you much more than that, depending on the specific programs and features you need for your computer and whether you are a business, personal, school or non-profit user. However, Open Office, the free office suite software offered by Sun Microsystems is not the best choice of office software for all users. Depending on your needs, Microsoft Office may be the better choice.

Open Office is free of charge to all users. Developers constantly update and tweak the functionalities of Open Office’s programs, and it gets better with each version. Open Office’s programs are similar in feature and function to many Microsoft Office programs. They include Writer for text documents, Calc for spreadsheets, impress for slide show presentations, draw for creating drawings, Math for a calculator and formulas and Base for databases.

One pro of Open Office is that it is compatible with Windows, Mac, Linux, Solaris and Free BSD. This makes it easy to download and use for almost any operating system. Another plus of Open Office is that you can download it at one time. You don’t have to download individual programs. Open Office documents can also be saved as files that Microsoft Office programs can read. This enables you to send or receive a file created in Open Office without worrying over whether it can be read. You can also easily export the file as a PDF without having to install extra conversion software. If you want to build a web page using a presentation or a drawing, you only need to click File>Export.

Today, the PC is often still considered just a tool, but together we need to make it a lot more than that. We need to make it a path to experiences.

Jim Allchin

Drawbacks to Open Office are many, however, for many users. For example, it does not offer all of the same functionalities as Microsoft Office. This can be particularly irritating for business users who need the advanced statistical and analytical features of Microsoft Office. Another downside to Open Office is that it takes a significant amount of memory and CPU time to operate. It is thus much slower than Microsoft Office. However, each new release of Open Office seems to take less time to perform the same functions as Microsoft Office. Open Office also does not offer nearly as many fonts in all of its programs as Microsoft Office. Support for Open Office is also limited compared to Microsoft Office. Since it is a free suite of software, the only support is available from other users and developers. Getting and finding the help you need when you need it can be a bit difficult.

Home computer users will likely find that Open Office will meet their needs nicely. They can avoid having to pay for Microsoft Office licenses. Learning to use Open Office may take some time if they are used to working with Microsoft Office. Business users will likely want to stick with using Microsoft Office for its advanced features and support offerings. The reasons you use office software will ultimately dictate which office program suite you use.

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