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3 Out Of 5 Companies Want Employees to Speak Fluent English

The majority of employers want their employees to speak English on the job. That makes sense for a variety of reasons. Employees who cannot communicate with each other are going to find it difficult to work together. Having one language on the job makes it easier for everyone to understand each other. What are some other possible reasons for wanting employees to speak English?

Majority of Americans Speak English

English is officially not the official language of the United States. However, most people in the United States do consider English to be their first language. Using English as the preferred language in the workplace makes sense because of this fact.

Employers Only Expect English To Be Spoken on The Job

Employees who are not fluent in English should not be too alarmed. Employers can only dictate the language you speak while on the job. This means that just a basic understanding of the English language is required. Taking some night classes after work should teach you enough English to get by on the job. It is only fair that foreign workers learn English as many more Americans are learning to communicate in other languages for business purposes.

English Is the Language of Business

The English language is the default language for business purposes around the world. Almost every student around the world learns a basic command of the English language. Learning how to speak English could very well help an employee no matter where they are employed. Many companies are going to do business with an American company at some point. Learning English just makes it easier to do business.

The art of communication is the language of leadership.

james humes 

Employers Can Monitor Employee Communication

You don’t want any illegal activity going on while employees are on the clock. The easiest way to slip something past your employer is to use a language that your employer does not understand. Not allowing employees to use a language other than English could add another layer of security for a business that pays employees to be ethical.

Communication is vital in the business world. Having all employees speaking the same language is important to good communication. There are many valid reasons why your employer may demand that English be spoken at all times while on the clock. Understanding everyone around you helps get the job done smoothly and safely at all times.

Give Your Employees a Constructive Feedback

Feedback in the workplace is an essential part of employee training and maintenance at most jobs. Unfortunately, due to the negative associations, most people have problems with receiving feedback and criticism from their superiors. The reception of feedback at work can be an extremely stressful experience. From a supervisor’s perspective, delivering feedback can be equally stressful when you know the person you are about to speak to and the supervisor would rather be anywhere else in the building at that moment.

However, giving feedback doesn’t have to be like giving an injection to a struggling child. With the right approach, giving your employees constructive feedback can be a polite, helpful, and even pleasant experience for both parties. Here are some tips for providing constructive feedback in an effective and non-threatening manner as a supervisor.

Start with positive feedback

This is perhaps the most important point to keep in mind when it comes to giving feedback that is intended to be constructive. You know that your employee will already be dreading meeting with you when you call him or her into your office. As a result, it can really help to put your employee at ease if you start by giving him or her information about things that he or she has been doing right instead of wrong.

Everyone likes hearing about things they are doing well, and most people don’t hear about such things nearly enough. You can set the meeting off on a positive tone that carries through well into any complaints or suggestions you offer later on if you make it a point to start out by praising the employee for things you would like him or her to keep doing on the job.

Every human being is entitled to courtesy and consideration. Constructive criticism is not only to be expected but sought.

Margaret Chase Smith

Get to the point quickly

This is essential to remember when giving constructive feedback. When you’ve got to say something negative or tell someone who works under you to change the way they’ve been doing things, you’ve got to say it as quickly as possible. This is because the person will probably be able to sense that negative information is coming his or her way long before you actually come out with it.

The longer you hesitate and hem and haw and beat around the bushes, the more anxious the receiver of the feedback will get, and that stress will not make the meeting go any better. In fact, the employee might become so stressed waiting for the feedback that he or she doesn’t even hear the feedback when you deliver it. If you’ve got bad news, get it over with quickly so you can start talking about how to make it better.

Show how to make things better

As stated above, the point of delivering the bad news should be to allow you to show how you can make things better. This doesn’t mean you need to hold the employee’s hand and guide him or her toward a solution, but it does mean that there isn’t much of a point in giving feedback about things that are going wrong if you don’t show how to make them right.

Is Nursery at Work a Good Thing?

Just like any supposedly cure-all for a social problem, on-site nursery for employees does not necessarily always work. It does, however, solve some problems for both employers and employees. Depending on the individual employers and employees involved, an onsite child care facility may be an answer that solves many problems associated with an out of balance work-family balance.

On-site day care reduces anxiety many parents have about putting their children in child care centers where they are not nearby. Being able to visit during lunch hours or breaks can be a significant relief to a parent. Nursing mothers are also able to return to work sooner and still be close to their infants. On-site nurseries are also often licensed by a governmental authority, which further eases parents’ worries that their children are not receiving age-appropriate care and safe supervision.

Employers also benefit from on-site nurseries in many cases. While it is not feasible or practical in all cases, those employers who do offer child care at work have typically seen a significant reduction in the amount of money they spend on labor each year. In the book Kids at Work: The Value of Employer-Sponsored On-Site Child Care Centers by Rachel Connelly, Deborah S. DeGraff, and Rachel A. Willis, two companies included in an approximately 1,000-strong employee survey that offered on-site nursery saved $150,000 and $250,000 per year in wages.

Moreover, employers with on-site nursery report reduced absenteeism and turnover. They are also able to recruit and retain workers they may not have otherwise been able to entice to work for them.

The most important part of education is proper training in the nursery.

Plato

Furthermore, employees were very willing to help subsidize childcare costs out of their paychecks, even those without children. They understood that on-site nursery would improve morale and productivity among workers with children. That would make the work environment generally more enjoyable for everyone. Furthermore, they were willing to help pay for on-site child care because they liked that the employer was willing to help its employees. Workers were willing to pay between $125 and $225 per year, on average, to help pay for work site child care.

On the other hand, it is true that in American society, about 27 percent of women work in blue collar jobs, and many of their employers would not consider on-site child care. Also, child care responsibilities in American society typically fall to women. Employers are also not offering health care services as often as they used to. Asking them to provide child care on-site is not likely to happen.

Perhaps a better alternative would be to provide longer maternity and paternity leave for parents. Flexible work schedules would also be a good option for many employers compared to providing on-site nursery. Nursery workers cannot take children to the doctor or care for them when they are ill, and school-aged children still require care between 3 and 6 p.m.

So, depending on a particular employer’s situation and the attitudes and financial situations of the people it hires, on-site child care may offer a good solution to labor problems like absenteeism and tardiness. Still, other employers may find similar benefits in more flexible work schedules and paid leave for both male and female new parents.

Should Employees Take Smoking Breaks?

Is it legal for employees to smoke in most workplaces these days? It seems as if there are fewer and fewer employers who permit smoking on the premises. Even if employers allow smoking, it would seem that taking a break is almost considered a crime these days.

There Is Just So Much to Do

Employers are doing as much as they can with as little help as possible. The economy dictates that other employees have to pick up the slack if a staff member is released. This means that there is less time for trivial matters like taking breaks. However, it might be a good idea to allow the employees to take a break every so often.

Do Smokers Have Rights?

Should those breaks include the possibility of smoking a cigarette? Corporations have to be wary about the health of every employee under its watch. On the other hand, corporations also have to make sure that they are not taking heat from employees who feel as if their rights have been violated. The core issue is whether or not smoking interferes with the ability to get the job done.

Smoking Is an Addictive Habit

Smoking can get in the way of the ability to think clearly on the job. Someone who smokes a lot might be thinking about that next cigarette as opposed to helping that next customer. Therefore, it is important to have a unified policy surrounding when an employee might be able to take a smoke break. It should be a policy that allows everyone to take a break at a certain time.

I think I’m going to take upsmoking at workso I can take 20breaks a day likethe rest of the smokers do.

Employees Who Take Breaks Do Better at Work

Employers should realize that employees who take breaks are going to be more productive. There is no value to having an employee who is burnt out before lunch. Allowing employees to take breaks will help them clear their mind of whatever is bugging them. It will also reduce stress levels in the short-term.

Employees should be allowed to take breaks while at work. While it might not be the healthiest option to smoke at work, each employee should be allowed to take a smoke break if they desire. Allowing an employee a few minutes per shift to unwind is going to help everyone in the workplace.

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