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Should You Hold a Job While Studying?

There are many arguments, both pro and con, regarding holding a job while going to school. Below, several of the advantages and disadvantages are examined in detail.

Some advantages to working while studying:

  • You’ll gain experience in the real world, maybe even in your field of study if you get a paid internship as a job. Interns are frequently hired by the company after graduation.
  • You may not have to borrow as much in student loans if you work while attending college, so you’ll have less of a loan debt after graduating. Some students who work are able to avoid student loans completely.
  • You’ll have extra spending money for eating, going out, socializing, or getting new clothes. You’ll also have more money if something unexpected happens, such as a major car repair or a rent increase.
  • You’ll seem more mature and responsible if you are able to show on your resume that you worked during college. It could help you land your dream job.

Of course, there are also some disadvantages to working while studying:

  • You might not be able to take as many credits per term, so it could take longer to graduate. Some students work full-time and go to school part-time.
  • If your classes are extremely challenging, you won’t have as much time to study. Your grades might be lower than if you were able to put all of your time into your classes.
  • You can focus completely on your courses, which might be less stressful than working while studying. You’ll have more leisure time and won’t feel like you’re spread too thin.

Study while others are sleeping; work while others are loafing; prepare while others are playing; and dream while others are wishing.

WILLIAM ARTHUR WARD

The list of advantages is somewhat longer than the disadvantages. In most cases, working at least part-time while attending school is beneficial. With the costs of tuition and books increasing every year, working can make a noticeable difference in the amount of student loan debt at graduation. Additionally, anything that can increase a new graduate’s likelihood of finding a job is almost a necessity in the current tough economy. Having the self-discipline to hold down a job and keep up with you class work is a good training for the corporate world, and the majority of the people looking at your resume will be impressed.

What You Haven’t Learned in School? How to Survive at Work

No one can discredit the importance of education, but schooling only gets you so far. Even if you worked part-time during college or completed an internship, you have no idea what you are in for once you start working full-time. College or specialty schools only give you the skills and information that you need to complete specific tasks in your job. College does not prepare you for what you actually encounter and face in your job. If you want to survive at work, you need to learn the tricks that make you the best employee possible.

The first thing you should learn is to dress appropriately for your job. Some people say that you should dress for the job that you want and not the job you have, but this is potentially risky. If you wear suits on a regular basis, while your co-workers wear jeans, you might draw too much attention to yourself. Take note of how your co-workers dress and present themselves at work and use that as inspiration. Spend time in the morning making yourself presentable and present a professional front. If you wear the wrong type of clothing, your supervisor might overlook you for any potential promotions.

Forming relationships is an important part of surviving in a new job. Even though you might not hang out with your co-workers after work or on weekends, you should still form relationships with those people. You should also attempt to form a relationship with your supervisors or bosses. The only way to get through the day is if you can work comfortably with others. When you set yourself apart from the group, you risk alienating your co-workers. The next time that you need support for a new idea, those co-workers might just look the other way.

I’ve been making a list of the things they don’t teach you at school. They don’t teach you how to love somebody. They don’t teach you how to be famous. They don’t teach you how to be rich or how to be poor. They don’t teach you how to walk away from someone you don’t love any longer. They don’t teach you how to know what’s going on in someone else’s mind. They don’t teach you what to say to someone who’s dying. They don’t teach you anything worth knowing.

NEIL GAIMAN 

College teaches you skills and how to complete tasks, but it does not teach you how to promote yourself. The only way that you can get ahead in your career field is by promoting your talents. The way that you promote yourself depends on your exact field. You might promote yourself by seeking out new clients or bringing sales from new clients into your business. You might promote yourself by making yourself available to customers and answering any questions that they have. You can even get ahead by taking the initiative and doing the jobs that your co-workers do not want to do.

To gain success in your career, you must take responsibility for your actions. You cannot expect to succeed if you simply do what your supervisor assigns to you. You must be willing to step up to the plate and go beyond your basic tasks. When your supervisor points out something particularly good that you did, make sure that you explain you did it yourself or with help from your co-workers. Only take responsibility for the things that you did and do take away from the work of your co-workers. Do not be afraid to take responsibility for the things that you did wrong either, as your supervisors might view it as a learning experience.

Single Subject Studying Is Harming Our Education

A troubling trend for many countries around the world is the rise of one subject focused study. Another way of putting this is that children are being trained to study only the things that relate to their potential future job. Whatever career path the child feels that he or she is on today is the one that they remain completely focused on until graduation. This may not sound like such a bad thing at first but consider the fact that there are many children who may have a very inaccurate idea of what they truthfully want to be. They could be wasting years of time (and plenty of taxpayer money) studying for things that are not going to be relevant to them in the future.

This problem has come in part as a result of a lack of funding for education. With not enough funds to go around, school districts are forced to make certain things priorities over others. They are often cutting back their art programs and more just to make room for what are considered the “core” subjects. Given this, students are being denied opportunities that their forerunners got without any question. Children are thus being forced out of learning about certain fields of study that they may be best suited for. Unfortunately, the problem only gets worse.

The way that the modern economy works, only those who hold a college degree can have any real expectation of holding a decent paying job. There are some who can get by without a college degree, but these cases are rare. Most without a college degree are struggling. As such, many parents are finding it to be the reasonable thing to do to try to encourage their children to narrow in on their focus in school. They want them to be as prepared as possible for a college education.

To acquire knowledge, one must study; but to acquire wisdom, one must observe.

Marilyn vos Savant

Many parents are almost forcing their children into fields that they may not actually have any interest in. Every year magazines release information about which college degrees pay the most in their fields. When parents see this, many want their children to get involved with these programs in order to be successful. Although their intentions are good, these are misguided actions.

Children have been shown to do best when they have a broad range of subjects to study and consider. They learn more about themselves and the world at the same time. If your child’s school is cutting back on certain programs, then you may consider helping your child to receive these vital skills through some other means. There are plenty of after school programs that would be happy to enroll your child into programs for the things they are missing out in their school day. It is important to try to avoid over scheduling your child too, so you will need to consider this as well.

It is unfortunate that many children feel that they have to narrow down their studies into one program, but that is the way that it is working so far these days. If you do not want this path for your child, then start to be proactive right now.

10 Skills Employers Look for in Future Employees

In today’s job market, some skills are valued more highly than others. Employers look for different skills based on the job, but several skills are desirable for many different fields. These skills can help job seekers beat out the competition for a job.

Computer Skills

Though there are jobs that require no computer interaction, there are many more that do. Even the most basic computer skills are helpful in many jobs. Basic skills include typing ability and understanding how to use computer software.

Teamwork

Many jobs require working in a collaborative environment. Employers look for employees that can handle taking direction from others and contribute to a healthy team environment. Those with egos are less desirable in many job atmospheres.

Communication Skills

Communication skills are crucial to just about any job. Employers desire employees who can communicate well through both verbal and written forms. Additionally, employees must be able to comprehend instructions well.

Positive Attitude

Job seekers who give off a negative attitude are not likely to get hired. A positive attitude tells the employer that the prospective employee is willing to do what it takes to get the job. Sometimes, a positive attitude is enough to get the job when the job seeker’s other skills don’t quite meet expectations.

Problem Solving

Through the course of a day, employees frequently come across new and challenging issues. Employers prefer workers who can tackle these problems and not give up. Even asking for help is an acceptable way to solve a problem on the job.

The mark of higher education isn’t the knowledge you accumulate in your head. It’s the skills you gain about how to learn.

Adam Grant

Math Skills

Math skills are useful in most jobs, though sometimes little more than basic math is required. Other jobs, however, rely heavily on solid and advanced math skills.

Flexibility

In today’s competitive world, many jobs require workers to be flexible enough to take on multiple projects at once. Retail workers, for example, are constantly dealing with separate customers requiring assistance. Good workers are able to juggle multiple issues at once without getting stressed.

Interaction with the Public

Many jobs, especially those in customer service, require constant interaction with members of the public. Employees need to have a pleasant demeanor and treat each customer with respect. Workers who get stressed and lash out at clients are not useful to an employer.

Research Skills

Employers are looking for potential employees who are able to research and analyze problems. The ability to research shows that a worker is able to take the initiative on a task and not wait around for explicit instructions. It also demonstrates that a worker is able to take on more responsibilities and assume a more active role in the company.

Work Ethic

A good work ethic is one of the most ideal skills for any employee to have. Many employers can get a hint of a prospective worker’s work ethic from a careful reading the worker’s resume. A solid work ethic demonstrates to an employer that the future employee will be punctual, efficient and able to meet deadlines.

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