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Tag: baby and work

Investing in Mom Power

Stay-at-home moms might not have as much business experience to put on a resume as they would like, but they can list plenty of practical experience based on their work raising their children. A mom has to handle raising kids, keeping the house clean, cooking for the family, and all of the other little tasks that keep everyone’s life running smoothly day in and day out. When a mom is ready to get back out into the business world, she can use the work she has done at home to enhance her resume.

Specialized Skills

Being at home with the children gives a mom the opportunity to pursue interests that she might not have looked into if she were working full time away from home. A mom who spends several hours each day communicating through social networking websites can list that on a resume as computer literacy. She is probably also a fast and accurate typist, which can help with some potential jobs outside her home. Any special hobbies that a mom enjoys could translate into marketable skills depending on the kind of job she is looking for.

Expert at Multi-Tasking

A mother’s work is rarely linear. Most moms have to deal with several jobs at the same time. A mom who is looking for work could comfortably list multi-tasking as one of the many skills she has picked up by working in her house. If a mom can handle cooking dinner, helping with homework, talking on the phone, and keeping the dog out of the trash can all at the same time there is a good chance she can handle several phone lines at once when she is sitting at a busy desk.

Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work.

THOMAS EDISON

Communication and Negotiation Practice

An important part of being a parent is knowing how to say what needs to be said in such a way that it gets through to the kids. In a household with more than one child, negotiation skills are vital to keeping the peace. A mom develops good communication skills as soon as her child begins to talk. She continues to hone those skills as the child grows, with the greatest challenges coming as the kids reach their teenage years. It is perfectly fine to list those hard-won communication skills in a resume. Sometimes real-life experience is more complex than the negotiations that might come up in a business setting.

Home Organization Translates to the Workplace

A big part of being a mother is keeping track of everyone’s schedule. A mom has to make sure all the kids get to their appointments on time, the pantry is stocked appropriately, and so on. The organization skills that are necessary at home are the same organization skills needed in the workplace. A good resume should include the practical organization and attention to detail that a mother develops them as part of her everyday life. Employers are always looking for someone who can manage time efficiently and be productive. Being a mom is excellent training for the workplace.

Guidelines for Working During Maternity Leave

Many new moms imagine maternity leave as a relaxing time to bond with their new baby. You might picture spending your maternity leave taking long walks with your baby, gazing into his precious eyes and reading your favorite children’s books over and over as he drifts off to sleep.

However, many moms face the reality of feeling pressured to work during their maternity leave. Conversely, some moms are disappointed that their office does not remain in contact with them during their time away. Each mom has different expectations when it comes to maternity leave. It is important to discuss both your needs and your employer’s needs long before the baby arrives.

Pre-planning and clear communication are the keys to a successful maternity leave. Several months before your due date, request a meeting with your supervisor. During this meeting, discuss the details of your upcoming maternity leave. How long will you be away from the office? Are you willing to accept phone calls or e-mails? Who will cover your normal duties during your leave? What paperwork needs to be completed? Does your supervisor have any concerns regarding your absence? Acquiring clear answers to these questions will align your plans with your employer’s expectations regarding your maternity leave.

Every time a woman leaves the workforce because she can’t find or afford childcare, or she can’t work out a flexible arrangement with her boss, or she has no paid maternity leave, her family’s income falls down a notch. Simultaneously, national productivity numbers decline.
Madeleine M. Kunin

As you approach your last day of work, compose an e-mail to send to your supervisor outlining your plan for maternity leave. Once your supervisor approves the plan, forward the e-mail to each of your colleagues. The e-mail should clearly state the start and end date of your maternity leave. It should also give guidelines for communicating with you during this time. For instance, you could state that you are unavailable by phone, but you will be checking your e-mail around 10:00am each Tuesday and Thursday to deal with any pressing issues.

Your e-mail should also give information regarding the contact person for your projects while you are away.

Once you, your supervisor and your colleagues all understand your maternity leave plan, you are free to relax and enjoy the most important thing: your new baby! Be polite, but consistent about your communication guidelines, and be sure to keep up with your end of the communication plan.

Work projects will be there when you return to your job, but you only get to spend the newborn days with your baby once. By planning carefully and practicing open communication, you can enjoy your maternity leave without alienating your workplace.

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