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How to Become a Judge?

A judge is a person who leads trials and ensures that the results are fair. Judges decide which cases go to trial, inform juries about the law, and make decisions about what lawyers can do based on the law. In criminal cases, the judge makes the decision of if a convicted defendant will go to prison and the duration of their term there. In civil cases, the judge decides the amount of money that one of the parties must pay the other. Becoming a judge is a long career path that must be worked on diligently. For most judges, that path starts in high school.

In high school, future judges should take extra English classes. These classes will help them perfect their writing skills and teach them effective research skills. Extra social studies classes are also a great asset for future judges, as students in these classes learn about the law. High school students who aim to become judges should study well and sharpen their reading skills.

After high school, a future judge must go to college. Prospective judges at this stage of their education are required to earn a bachelor’s degree, usually majoring in English, criminal justice, political science, history, or psychology. Since there is no major that is specifically pre-law, students hoping to enter law school may earn any bachelor of arts or bachelor of science degree. These students can then move on to law school, where they will study for about three years.

Judging is a lonely job in which a man is, as near as may be, an island entire.

Abe Fortas

After graduating from law school, most judges work as lawyers. For those hoping to become a Federal or State judge, experience working as a lawyer is usually a requirement. Training for new judges is available in all states. Even once someone becomes a judge, their education doesn’t stop there. Judges continue their education throughout their careers, taking short classes in the law periodically. A judge conducts research about legal issues and writes about their decisions and their legal opinions. For judges, learning more about the law is a lifelong pursuit.

A person looking into becoming a judge should have a strong mind and a good memory for the law. They should be patient and have good judgment. A future judge must be willing to make a commitment to learning. They should enjoy research and writing about the law. For those with ambition and the willingness to be dedicated to upholding the law in a courtroom, becoming a judge would be an excellent choice.

Single Subject Studying Is Harming Our Education

A troubling trend for many countries around the world is the rise of one subject focused study. Another way of putting this is that children are being trained to study only the things that relate to their potential future job. Whatever career path the child feels that he or she is on today is the one that they remain completely focused on until graduation. This may not sound like such a bad thing at first but consider the fact that there are many children who may have a very inaccurate idea of what they truthfully want to be. They could be wasting years of time (and plenty of taxpayer money) studying for things that are not going to be relevant to them in the future.

This problem has come in part as a result of a lack of funding for education. With not enough funds to go around, school districts are forced to make certain things priorities over others. They are often cutting back their art programs and more just to make room for what are considered the “core” subjects. Given this, students are being denied opportunities that their forerunners got without any question. Children are thus being forced out of learning about certain fields of study that they may be best suited for. Unfortunately, the problem only gets worse.

The way that the modern economy works, only those who hold a college degree can have any real expectation of holding a decent paying job. There are some who can get by without a college degree, but these cases are rare. Most without a college degree are struggling. As such, many parents are finding it to be the reasonable thing to do to try to encourage their children to narrow in on their focus in school. They want them to be as prepared as possible for a college education.

To acquire knowledge, one must study; but to acquire wisdom, one must observe.

Marilyn vos Savant

Many parents are almost forcing their children into fields that they may not actually have any interest in. Every year magazines release information about which college degrees pay the most in their fields. When parents see this, many want their children to get involved with these programs in order to be successful. Although their intentions are good, these are misguided actions.

Children have been shown to do best when they have a broad range of subjects to study and consider. They learn more about themselves and the world at the same time. If your child’s school is cutting back on certain programs, then you may consider helping your child to receive these vital skills through some other means. There are plenty of after school programs that would be happy to enroll your child into programs for the things they are missing out in their school day. It is important to try to avoid over scheduling your child too, so you will need to consider this as well.

It is unfortunate that many children feel that they have to narrow down their studies into one program, but that is the way that it is working so far these days. If you do not want this path for your child, then start to be proactive right now.

What You Shouldn’t Do When Writing Your Resume

Ideally, a job seeker’s resume should be a comprehensive, accurate account of that person’s skills, education, and work experience. However, it appears people are increasingly being tempted to fudge key resume details or concoct outright fabrications to embellish their personal stories. Some experts put the instance of inaccuracies on executive’s resumes at upwards of 20%, while the FBI is on record stating that approximately 500,000 Americans claim college degrees they have not earned. A recent high-profile technology company CEO was abruptly terminated for the transgression of lying on his resume. Here are some examples of resume falsehoods that are under increasing scrutiny from employers:

Education

Job seekers often lie about the level of education they have attained, perhaps stretching a Bachelor’s degree into a Master’s, or even claiming a college degree where none exists. While it is possible a prospective employer will not verify the accuracy of educational achievements, it is extremely risky to make that assumption. Another common example of educational truth stretching is dressing up one’s grade point average, or claiming honors (Dean’s List, etc.) that the individual didn’t achieve.

Job Responsibilities

There is often a fine line between putting oneself in the most favorable light and fudging past achievements. Certainly, the job seeker should be willing to market themselves aggressively via their resume, but falsifying skills and experience levels can come back to haunt an individual if they wind up getting hired and can’t deliver against the job requirements. The unethical job seeker may win in the short term by getting hired, but ultimately their long-term employment marketability will be diminished if they’re terminated quickly for poor performance.

Salary

Lying about compensation at previous jobs is also common among job seekers. People are tempted to embellish previous salaries in the hope that the inflated numbers will provide them with leverage when negotiating pay levels with their prospective employers. However, an increasing number of employers are now requiring that job seekers back up their salary history claims by providing W-2 copies.

Duties and Achievements

Don’t write about your duties, mention achievements. Achievements are individual accomplishments that stand out and tell your future employer about your skills. Duties, on the other hand, merely rehash day-to-day minutiae; all the low-level activities that every person holding a similar job title deals with every day. To give an example: If you are a sales professional with a $5,000 per month quota, reaching that quota is your duty. Reaching $10,000 a month is an achievement and represents the kind of information that makes a difference.

Professional Licenses

Some unscrupulous job seekers try and claim professional licenses they have not attained, such as Certified Public Accountant (CPA), nursing board certification, and Certified Financial Planner (CFP). There are also a myriad of certifications for special skills within disciplines that are erroneously claimed by unethical job seekers. The bad news for these dishonest applicants is it’s relatively easy for employers to check with the accrediting agencies to ensure the veracity of their claims.

Your value lies not in status or title, but in the roots of your character and depth of your compassion.”

Mollie MartI

Avoiding the temptation to take liberties with a professional resume is clearly in the best long-term interests of the job seeker. Today’s employers are doing much more due diligence on applicants by verifying resume information data. Taking the high road and maintaining your personal integrity is more important than attempting to exploit a short-term employment opportunity.

A well-written resume is important for any job seeker. Too many people think that for example senior citizens are not able to contribute to the economy just as much as anyone else. The truth of the matter is that there are now more seniors on the job hunt than there ever has been. Considering this, those who do fall in this age group are going to want to learn how to write a resume for the modern economy jobs they seek.

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