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Is Nursery at Work a Good Thing?

Just like any supposedly cure-all for a social problem, on-site nursery for employees does not necessarily always work. It does, however, solve some problems for both employers and employees. Depending on the individual employers and employees involved, an onsite child care facility may be an answer that solves many problems associated with an out of balance work-family balance.

On-site day care reduces anxiety many parents have about putting their children in child care centers where they are not nearby. Being able to visit during lunch hours or breaks can be a significant relief to a parent. Nursing mothers are also able to return to work sooner and still be close to their infants. On-site nurseries are also often licensed by a governmental authority, which further eases parents’ worries that their children are not receiving age-appropriate care and safe supervision.

Employers also benefit from on-site nurseries in many cases. While it is not feasible or practical in all cases, those employers who do offer child care at work have typically seen a significant reduction in the amount of money they spend on labor each year. In the book Kids at Work: The Value of Employer-Sponsored On-Site Child Care Centers by Rachel Connelly, Deborah S. DeGraff, and Rachel A. Willis, two companies included in an approximately 1,000-strong employee survey that offered on-site nursery saved $150,000 and $250,000 per year in wages.

Moreover, employers with on-site nursery report reduced absenteeism and turnover. They are also able to recruit and retain workers they may not have otherwise been able to entice to work for them.

The most important part of education is proper training in the nursery.

Plato

Furthermore, employees were very willing to help subsidize childcare costs out of their paychecks, even those without children. They understood that on-site nursery would improve morale and productivity among workers with children. That would make the work environment generally more enjoyable for everyone. Furthermore, they were willing to help pay for on-site child care because they liked that the employer was willing to help its employees. Workers were willing to pay between $125 and $225 per year, on average, to help pay for work site child care.

On the other hand, it is true that in American society, about 27 percent of women work in blue collar jobs, and many of their employers would not consider on-site child care. Also, child care responsibilities in American society typically fall to women. Employers are also not offering health care services as often as they used to. Asking them to provide child care on-site is not likely to happen.

Perhaps a better alternative would be to provide longer maternity and paternity leave for parents. Flexible work schedules would also be a good option for many employers compared to providing on-site nursery. Nursery workers cannot take children to the doctor or care for them when they are ill, and school-aged children still require care between 3 and 6 p.m.

So, depending on a particular employer’s situation and the attitudes and financial situations of the people it hires, on-site child care may offer a good solution to labor problems like absenteeism and tardiness. Still, other employers may find similar benefits in more flexible work schedules and paid leave for both male and female new parents.

I Hate My Boss!

I should have known my job wasn’t the right fit when, during the interview with my soon-to-be boss, it became obvious he hadn’t even glanced at my resume. Although I have years of experience in both writing and finance, he asked me questions that made his ignorance of these facts clear. It also didn’t help that he had no idea what to ask me and kept asking pointed questions about my future plans for a family. At one point, he stated that the two previous women he’d hired had left as soon as they became pregnant. I had no idea how to respond.

He called me immediately after the interview and offered me the position. When I requested an offer letter, he brushed it aside and asked me to come in the next morning! I had to explain that I needed to give my current employer notice and renegotiate a start date. He also couldn’t tell me the precise starting salary. Instead, he provided me with the name and number of a man who worked in accounting.

When I arrived for orientation, I was dumbfounded by the tasks I was being shown how to perform. For several hours, I was shown how to code in photos onto the company website. The person assigned to instruct me seemed dumbfounded that I wasn’t familiar with this process whatsoever. After conferring with my boss, the man who had interviewed me, it was discovered that he had hired the wrong person entirely.

Before I started a company, I was an employee with a bad attitude. I was always felt like, bosses are stupid, and people weren’t well treated.

Mitch Kapor

Amazingly, I was transferred to another job within the same company that he believed was more suited to my considerable experience. My boss has never lived down his huge mistake and has taken every opportunity available to remind me that he hired me accidentally. He schedules me to work every weekend and major holiday. He also hands me the worst, most tedious projects available, none of which require much writing or financial acumen.

Hopefully, I will not be saddled with my boss for much longer. While he didn’t bother to read my resume and confirm my identity, I have much more faith in other companies. My perfectly polished resume is making the rounds and I am praying for another offer to come my way.

People Are More Afraid of Losing Their Jobs

When someone says, “I don’t want to be unemployed,” that person joins millions of other workers who are worried about the future. Losing a job can be a difficult experience even in a good economy, but when the economy struggles, so does the job market. Millions of long-term unemployed workers testify to the fact they can’t find a job after losing the one they had. Therefore, many people should make keeping their current job a priority.

Even a great resume is no guarantee of getting a job, because a long record of experience and education can be something of a disadvantage. With so many people out of work, industry veterans are at a disadvantage to younger workers who can start at a lower salary. With so many students it’s an added problem when it comes to finding a job.

There are some things workers can do now to make them less vulnerable to a layoff.

Become more valuable. Workers who offer the most value to their company are most likely to keep their job. Any employee should evaluate his or her position and find ways to become essential to their company’s mission. This could mean developing new skills. A wise employee will find out what skills their employer needs and then learn them. This works well, especially if the needed skills are in short supply in the current workforce.

Building skills may mean taking some college classes or doing some self-study, but the extra time spent in personal and professional development will pay off when layoff time comes. Those with fewer skills have less value and will be the first ones out the door.

When people under the age of 30 are applying for jobs, it is common to see resumes that touch on education but emphasize experience – both in life and in the workplace. The job market has changed so much over the years that it is now quite common for young adults to have already worked for a variety of different companies and to even have held multiple positions of the type that would have occupied a person’s entire career a few decades ago. In fact, aside from those who work in family businesses or dedicate themselves to certain fields, such as teaching, law enforcement and a variety of jobs typically falling into the blue-collar category, it is now perfectly normal for people to make multiple career changes throughout their working years.

If you’re brave enough to say goodbye, life will reward you with another hello.

Paulo Coelho

Employment experience and job duties are essential to any resume, and life experiences that show you are a well-rounded person with diverse interests and an interesting life can certainly help you stand out as a unique applicant in a large pool of resumes. At the same time, it is essential to keep in mind that older generations generally place a higher importance on education. This means that you must ensure you have included a strong, well-written education section on your resume that spells out your areas of study, academic achievements, and degrees, diplomas or certificates earned.

Improving skills is another way to boost survivability in the workplace. Anyone with a commitment to excellence will be the last to go. Anyone can do average work and produce average results, but those who produce exceptional results will keep their jobs while others are in the unemployment line.

More than half of people who leave their jobs do so because of their relationship with their boss. Smart companies make certain their managers know how to balance being professional with being human. These are the bosses who celebrate an employee’s success, empathize with those going through hard times, and challenge people, even when it hurts.

Travis Bradberry

There’s an old saying that says, “It’s not what you know, it’s who you know.” Knowing the right people in a company can make the difference between beans and steak at supper. Those who want to keep their jobs will make a concerted, planned effort to set goals for meeting and pleasing the right people at the office. When the decision makers start making the lay-off list, the workers who they don’t know will be at the top.

Finally, a worker who doesn’t want to be unemployed should make his boss look good. When a worker finds ways to help the boss by taking on new responsibilities, completing special projects and providing useful ideas; that worker will have a job for a long time.

10 Skills Employers Look for in Future Employees

In today’s job market, some skills are valued more highly than others. Employers look for different skills based on the job, but several skills are desirable for many different fields. These skills can help job seekers beat out the competition for a job.

Computer Skills

Though there are jobs that require no computer interaction, there are many more that do. Even the most basic computer skills are helpful in many jobs. Basic skills include typing ability and understanding how to use computer software.

Teamwork

Many jobs require working in a collaborative environment. Employers look for employees that can handle taking direction from others and contribute to a healthy team environment. Those with egos are less desirable in many job atmospheres.

Communication Skills

Communication skills are crucial to just about any job. Employers desire employees who can communicate well through both verbal and written forms. Additionally, employees must be able to comprehend instructions well.

Positive Attitude

Job seekers who give off a negative attitude are not likely to get hired. A positive attitude tells the employer that the prospective employee is willing to do what it takes to get the job. Sometimes, a positive attitude is enough to get the job when the job seeker’s other skills don’t quite meet expectations.

Problem Solving

Through the course of a day, employees frequently come across new and challenging issues. Employers prefer workers who can tackle these problems and not give up. Even asking for help is an acceptable way to solve a problem on the job.

The mark of higher education isn’t the knowledge you accumulate in your head. It’s the skills you gain about how to learn.

Adam Grant

Math Skills

Math skills are useful in most jobs, though sometimes little more than basic math is required. Other jobs, however, rely heavily on solid and advanced math skills.

Flexibility

In today’s competitive world, many jobs require workers to be flexible enough to take on multiple projects at once. Retail workers, for example, are constantly dealing with separate customers requiring assistance. Good workers are able to juggle multiple issues at once without getting stressed.

Interaction with the Public

Many jobs, especially those in customer service, require constant interaction with members of the public. Employees need to have a pleasant demeanor and treat each customer with respect. Workers who get stressed and lash out at clients are not useful to an employer.

Research Skills

Employers are looking for potential employees who are able to research and analyze problems. The ability to research shows that a worker is able to take the initiative on a task and not wait around for explicit instructions. It also demonstrates that a worker is able to take on more responsibilities and assume a more active role in the company.

Work Ethic

A good work ethic is one of the most ideal skills for any employee to have. Many employers can get a hint of a prospective worker’s work ethic from a careful reading the worker’s resume. A solid work ethic demonstrates to an employer that the future employee will be punctual, efficient and able to meet deadlines.

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