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Give Your Employees a Constructive Feedback

Feedback in the workplace is an essential part of employee training and maintenance at most jobs. Unfortunately, due to the negative associations, most people have problems with receiving feedback and criticism from their superiors. The reception of feedback at work can be an extremely stressful experience. From a supervisor’s perspective, delivering feedback can be equally stressful when you know the person you are about to speak to and the supervisor would rather be anywhere else in the building at that moment.

However, giving feedback doesn’t have to be like giving an injection to a struggling child. With the right approach, giving your employees constructive feedback can be a polite, helpful, and even pleasant experience for both parties. Here are some tips for providing constructive feedback in an effective and non-threatening manner as a supervisor.

Start with positive feedback

This is perhaps the most important point to keep in mind when it comes to giving feedback that is intended to be constructive. You know that your employee will already be dreading meeting with you when you call him or her into your office. As a result, it can really help to put your employee at ease if you start by giving him or her information about things that he or she has been doing right instead of wrong.

Everyone likes hearing about things they are doing well, and most people don’t hear about such things nearly enough. You can set the meeting off on a positive tone that carries through well into any complaints or suggestions you offer later on if you make it a point to start out by praising the employee for things you would like him or her to keep doing on the job.

Every human being is entitled to courtesy and consideration. Constructive criticism is not only to be expected but sought.

Margaret Chase Smith

Get to the point quickly

This is essential to remember when giving constructive feedback. When you’ve got to say something negative or tell someone who works under you to change the way they’ve been doing things, you’ve got to say it as quickly as possible. This is because the person will probably be able to sense that negative information is coming his or her way long before you actually come out with it.

The longer you hesitate and hem and haw and beat around the bushes, the more anxious the receiver of the feedback will get, and that stress will not make the meeting go any better. In fact, the employee might become so stressed waiting for the feedback that he or she doesn’t even hear the feedback when you deliver it. If you’ve got bad news, get it over with quickly so you can start talking about how to make it better.

Show how to make things better

As stated above, the point of delivering the bad news should be to allow you to show how you can make things better. This doesn’t mean you need to hold the employee’s hand and guide him or her toward a solution, but it does mean that there isn’t much of a point in giving feedback about things that are going wrong if you don’t show how to make them right.

How to Catch Attention During Interview?

Job interviews are conducted by hiring managers in order to choose the best candidate for the job opening. The hiring manager’s job is to ask specific questions to determine the right fit for the company. You can improve your interview skills by understanding the process. The more interviews you go on, the better you will become at interviewing. The interview is your chance to impress and show the manager that you want the job. One way to accomplish this is to research the company before your interview. This shows that you have made the effort to learn about the company.

Dressing in professional attire will portray a professional image to the hiring manager. Women should wear a dress or skirt with a dress jacket, and men should wear dress slacks, dress shirt and a jacket. Pay special attention to your grooming because interviewers do notice the small details. Don’t arrive for your interview more than ten minutes early and don’t be late. Drive to the location before your interview date arrives to be sure you know where it’s located. If you are late, you likely will not be considered.

There are common interview questions that are consistently asked during a job interview. You can find a list of interview questions online. Study them and practice with a friend or family member. Being prepared with interview answers will help to ease your fears about the unknown. Even though you are nervous, you must appear calm and confident. If the interviewer asks you a few slightly different questions than you studied for, you will still come across confident and prepared.

Job-interviewing is just a skill. Like any skill, some people have more of a predisposition for it than others.

Dale Dauten

At the end of the interview, the hiring manager will ask you if you have any questions. You should prepare ahead and memorize some questions about the company. It is considered unacceptable to ask about salary and benefits at this stage of the application process. If you are offered a job with the company, you will be told about the salary and benefits at that time. A common mistake is to say that you have no questions. Hiring managers want to know that you are eager about their company and asking questions will show your enthusiasm. Ask questions about the company that shows the hiring manager that you are interested in the position.

When the interview is over, smile and shake hands with your interviewer. The hiring manager will let you know when to expect a hiring decision to be made. You can set yourself apart by sending a thank-you note to the interviewer. A lot of people don’t do this and the interviewer will be impressed. Finding a job is a number’s game. The more interviews you go on, the more relaxed you will appear, and this will increase your hiring chances. After a few interviews, you will be surprised at how easy the process really is. Everyone gets nervous going to a job interview but appearing confident is the best way to receive the call that brings a job offer.

Is Nursery at Work a Good Thing?

Just like any supposedly cure-all for a social problem, on-site nursery for employees does not necessarily always work. It does, however, solve some problems for both employers and employees. Depending on the individual employers and employees involved, an onsite child care facility may be an answer that solves many problems associated with an out of balance work-family balance.

On-site day care reduces anxiety many parents have about putting their children in child care centers where they are not nearby. Being able to visit during lunch hours or breaks can be a significant relief to a parent. Nursing mothers are also able to return to work sooner and still be close to their infants. On-site nurseries are also often licensed by a governmental authority, which further eases parents’ worries that their children are not receiving age-appropriate care and safe supervision.

Employers also benefit from on-site nurseries in many cases. While it is not feasible or practical in all cases, those employers who do offer child care at work have typically seen a significant reduction in the amount of money they spend on labor each year. In the book Kids at Work: The Value of Employer-Sponsored On-Site Child Care Centers by Rachel Connelly, Deborah S. DeGraff, and Rachel A. Willis, two companies included in an approximately 1,000-strong employee survey that offered on-site nursery saved $150,000 and $250,000 per year in wages.

Moreover, employers with on-site nursery report reduced absenteeism and turnover. They are also able to recruit and retain workers they may not have otherwise been able to entice to work for them.

The most important part of education is proper training in the nursery.

Plato

Furthermore, employees were very willing to help subsidize childcare costs out of their paychecks, even those without children. They understood that on-site nursery would improve morale and productivity among workers with children. That would make the work environment generally more enjoyable for everyone. Furthermore, they were willing to help pay for on-site child care because they liked that the employer was willing to help its employees. Workers were willing to pay between $125 and $225 per year, on average, to help pay for work site child care.

On the other hand, it is true that in American society, about 27 percent of women work in blue collar jobs, and many of their employers would not consider on-site child care. Also, child care responsibilities in American society typically fall to women. Employers are also not offering health care services as often as they used to. Asking them to provide child care on-site is not likely to happen.

Perhaps a better alternative would be to provide longer maternity and paternity leave for parents. Flexible work schedules would also be a good option for many employers compared to providing on-site nursery. Nursery workers cannot take children to the doctor or care for them when they are ill, and school-aged children still require care between 3 and 6 p.m.

So, depending on a particular employer’s situation and the attitudes and financial situations of the people it hires, on-site child care may offer a good solution to labor problems like absenteeism and tardiness. Still, other employers may find similar benefits in more flexible work schedules and paid leave for both male and female new parents.

I Hate My Boss!

I should have known my job wasn’t the right fit when, during the interview with my soon-to-be boss, it became obvious he hadn’t even glanced at my resume. Although I have years of experience in both writing and finance, he asked me questions that made his ignorance of these facts clear. It also didn’t help that he had no idea what to ask me and kept asking pointed questions about my future plans for a family. At one point, he stated that the two previous women he’d hired had left as soon as they became pregnant. I had no idea how to respond.

He called me immediately after the interview and offered me the position. When I requested an offer letter, he brushed it aside and asked me to come in the next morning! I had to explain that I needed to give my current employer notice and renegotiate a start date. He also couldn’t tell me the precise starting salary. Instead, he provided me with the name and number of a man who worked in accounting.

When I arrived for orientation, I was dumbfounded by the tasks I was being shown how to perform. For several hours, I was shown how to code in photos onto the company website. The person assigned to instruct me seemed dumbfounded that I wasn’t familiar with this process whatsoever. After conferring with my boss, the man who had interviewed me, it was discovered that he had hired the wrong person entirely.

Before I started a company, I was an employee with a bad attitude. I was always felt like, bosses are stupid, and people weren’t well treated.

Mitch Kapor

Amazingly, I was transferred to another job within the same company that he believed was more suited to my considerable experience. My boss has never lived down his huge mistake and has taken every opportunity available to remind me that he hired me accidentally. He schedules me to work every weekend and major holiday. He also hands me the worst, most tedious projects available, none of which require much writing or financial acumen.

Hopefully, I will not be saddled with my boss for much longer. While he didn’t bother to read my resume and confirm my identity, I have much more faith in other companies. My perfectly polished resume is making the rounds and I am praying for another offer to come my way.

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