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I Hate My Boss!

I should have known my job wasn’t the right fit when, during the interview with my soon-to-be boss, it became obvious he hadn’t even glanced at my resume. Although I have years of experience in both writing and finance, he asked me questions that made his ignorance of these facts clear. It also didn’t help that he had no idea what to ask me and kept asking pointed questions about my future plans for a family. At one point, he stated that the two previous women he’d hired had left as soon as they became pregnant. I had no idea how to respond.

He called me immediately after the interview and offered me the position. When I requested an offer letter, he brushed it aside and asked me to come in the next morning! I had to explain that I needed to give my current employer notice and renegotiate a start date. He also couldn’t tell me the precise starting salary. Instead, he provided me with the name and number of a man who worked in accounting.

When I arrived for orientation, I was dumbfounded by the tasks I was being shown how to perform. For several hours, I was shown how to code in photos onto the company website. The person assigned to instruct me seemed dumbfounded that I wasn’t familiar with this process whatsoever. After conferring with my boss, the man who had interviewed me, it was discovered that he had hired the wrong person entirely.

Before I started a company, I was an employee with a bad attitude. I was always felt like, bosses are stupid, and people weren’t well treated.

Mitch Kapor

Amazingly, I was transferred to another job within the same company that he believed was more suited to my considerable experience. My boss has never lived down his huge mistake and has taken every opportunity available to remind me that he hired me accidentally. He schedules me to work every weekend and major holiday. He also hands me the worst, most tedious projects available, none of which require much writing or financial acumen.

Hopefully, I will not be saddled with my boss for much longer. While he didn’t bother to read my resume and confirm my identity, I have much more faith in other companies. My perfectly polished resume is making the rounds and I am praying for another offer to come my way.

When You are Dispensable

When you are dispensable, it is a good idea to be prepared to start looking for another job. No one is truly indispensable, so it makes sense to prepare for a lay-off or termination just in case either one happens. You can do this by updating several areas of your professional life: your resume, network, online presence, and professional development.

Resume

One of the best things you can do to prepare yourself to look for another job at a moment’s notice is to update your resume and portfolio. Insert examples of any achievements or accomplishments into your portfolio. Update your resume with your current employment information, including your accomplishments and awards. Also include any training you have completed or are currently working on since you last updated your resume.

Your resume should be geared toward the type of job for which you would next apply. Create a couple versions of it if you plan on applying for more than one type of a job. When you will have to upload your resume or email it, you will have the basic structure for each type of position for which you want to apply.

Anyway, a powerful resume can lead to a higher-paying job. Whether you are seeking primary employment, supplemental employment or a career change, one of the most important tools you need to find the job you want is a solid, well-written resume that showcases your education and experience, and will help you land steady employment.

Network and Train

Quietly start to talk to people with whom you have networked online and offline. Don’t mention that you think you may be laid off soon. Just let them know that you are open to new job opportunities. There is no need to spread any rumor that you and other employees in your company may soon be laid off or otherwise terminated. If you are not sure whether or when you will be let go, just maintain and cultivate relationships so that you can ask for job leads when you need to. You must offer help to others as well. Relationships are two-way streets. Also clean up and enhance your online presence to create a professional image that highlights your experience and talents.

Seek out training to update your computer, presentation, time management or other work-related skills. Add these to your resume to indicate that you take professional development seriously. This indicates to employers that you are adaptable and ready to learn.

Most people work just hard enough not to get fired and get paid just enough money not to quit.
George Carlin

Budget

Finally, get your finances in order. If you don’t know how much money you currently spend on loan payments, groceries, rent, and other monthly expenditures, find out and write it down. This can help you plan for where you may need to cut down on expenses if you lose your job. It also helps you learn what your monthly income requirement is. Start saving money in an emergency fund as well. Having three to six months of living expenses is recommended. If you must reduce the amount you contribute to build up your savings account, do so. However, continue making contributions of at least what your employer matches.

Continue to do well at work. Avoid gossiping about the lay-off or becoming too bitter. It will show in your work. You need good recommendations from your boss, so work hard and keep a good attitude.

Who is choosing you during interview?

The first step toward getting an interview at a company is usually by submitting a resume. Your resume should be written to attract the attention of the reader, whether it is an actual person or a computer. Both will quickly scan the resume looking for information that highlights your skills and qualifications. Your resume is your most powerful marketing tool and is very often your only chance at getting an interview.

If you do submit your resume to a company and you are invited for an interview, your resume has successfully portrayed you as a potential hire and the company wants more information. During the interview you will be probed for more details. What do you bring to the table? Why should they hire you instead of another candidate?

At the interview you may be interviewed by one interviewer or many, by someone from Human Resources, hiring managers and potential supervisors. An interview can be one-on-one or a group interview with several interviewers, in some cases even including other candidates interviewing for the same job.

A job interview is not a test of your knowledge, but your ability to use it at the right time.

Always enter an interview prepared with knowledge of the company and the reasons why you want the job. Be prepared with examples of how your skills qualify you for the job. If taken to lunch, consider it part of the interview. You are being observed in a social setting. Be careful what you say and go light on the alcohol.

As resumes play such a critical role in the hiring process, you need a good one. Resumes are typically one page, two at most, and you need cram a lot of important information into those pages, selling yourself as a candidate worthy of a job interview.

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