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Job Guideline Tips at Work

Is Mental Work Better Than Manual Work?

Creating a quality resume that sells your astonishing talents and proficient skills can be a harrowing task. Add other elements to the process, such as switching career goals, and you get an agonizing situation that surely perplex your already staggering nerves. Never fear, you can highlight your talents in a skilled way via the resume, even if switching from one style of work to a completely different professional endeavour, such as manual work to mental, or in some cases switching to mind over matter.

Manual work requires a complementary personality emphasized by the proficient use of tactile skills, plus an excellent sense of detail, use of physical strength and the desire to remain dedicated to laborious job repetition and hours. Building a solid work history in manual work is significant but making the transition into a career path that allows you to tap into that other side of your mind takes a whole other realm of skills. Conversely, those with a strong history of mental work like social workers in mental health or medical counsellors, might find that physical labour does not come as easy, and making the switch over could pose a daunting burden. To say one form of work is better than the other is truly a moot point because each field requires a personal dexterity, acquired talents and job specific adroitness. No matter the case, you can make a switch from manual work to mental work with a smooth transition that is completely accentuated by a solid, shining resume.

Things to keep in mind when formulating a resume that differs from your foundation of work history include specific education and competencies that make you a viable candidate for the intended job. Research the exact education requirements for the job before submitting a resume and if you meet the qualifications, impress upon the similar qualities you have in one type of job that transcend into the other field. For instance, manual work is detailed and emphasizes use of tangible sensory skills whereas mental work utilizes detail orientation too, but through intangible means. In clarifying your attentiveness to detail, you want to thoroughly outline the ability without overselling it or embellishing on a skill you cannot deliver.

I’ve always been amused by the contention that brain work is harder than manual labor. I’ve never known a man to leave a desk for a muck-stick if he could avoid it.”
John Steinbeck

Colourful adjectives, simple phrasing and concise explanations are valuable on a quality resume. Sell yourself but remain truthful. If your work experience in the manual job does not in any way complement your pursuit of a mental job, that does not mean you are not a good candidate, it just means you need to find a bridge between what you know and what you want so a potential employer takes the time to meet the person behind the writing.

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Job Guideline Living abroad

How to Prepare for Working Abroad

It could be said that many people wish they could leave their old lives behind and try something new. This may imply moving across a street or even across a state. However, while not as high in number, you are among those that wish to leave behind an entire country. But how can you go about breaking through and entering a brand-new culture? What should you consider as you work towards your goal?

1. Think about the Job You Would Like to Have

Before you start on your goal of getting a job abroad, you should first think about the job that you would like to obtain. Perhaps you would like to go for a career field that is brand new to you, or maybe you would like to stick with what you are currently doing. In any case, you should not go into things with no clear plan; doing so can only cause you to waste time and money. You will become frustrated and may even wish to give up shortly after starting.

2. Know the Companies and Countries You Are Interested In

Once you have established what is the job you would like to do, you then need to put in the proper research. If you have a country that you would like to relocate to, you need to be aware of the jobs that may be available. What companies will allow a foreigner to join the payroll? What are you expected to know, and what would you be expected to do? You should be aware of how a company operates, along with how they typically behave and where in a country they are located. The more you know, the more impressed the company will be when you contact them.

When working abroad you work pretty hard, but with time off, this is the greatest job in the world. You drive. You explore Memphis, or wherever you’ve landed, or go and see Dr John, or the Californian landscape. And, yes, I’ve had a few good meals.

Toby Jones

3. Prepare for Interviews

Just as you are in your native country, you need to prepare yourself for interviews. Although you may not meet any interviewers in person, this does not mean that you should talk to them in inappropriate clothing. In some cases, you may hold a video interview with somebody, and it would not be appropriate to wear your sleepwear. Think about the questions that you may be asked and come up with answers for each of them. If you need help, ask a loved one to offer advice and assistance. You should also come up with a resume to present. Resumes are essential to your success.

4. Follow-Up with Interviews and Visit the Country You Would Be Living In

Once the interviews have been conducted, you should not simply sit back and wait for somebody to call you. If you want to demonstrate how serious you are, you should perform follow-up phone calls. Let people know that you await information and that you are still interested. It may also be in your best interest to visit the country that you may live in. It is vital that you determine whether you would be happy there and if you could deal with certain issues. You should not wait until you have been hired and it is too late to back out.