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Is Nursery at Work a Good Thing?

Just like any supposedly cure-all for a social problem, on-site nursery for employees does not necessarily always work. It does, however, solve some problems for both employers and employees. Depending on the individual employers and employees involved, an onsite child care facility may be an answer that solves many problems associated with an out of balance work-family balance.

On-site day care reduces anxiety many parents have about putting their children in child care centers where they are not nearby. Being able to visit during lunch hours or breaks can be a significant relief to a parent. Nursing mothers are also able to return to work sooner and still be close to their infants. On-site nurseries are also often licensed by a governmental authority, which further eases parents’ worries that their children are not receiving age-appropriate care and safe supervision.

Employers also benefit from on-site nurseries in many cases. While it is not feasible or practical in all cases, those employers who do offer child care at work have typically seen a significant reduction in the amount of money they spend on labor each year. In the book Kids at Work: The Value of Employer-Sponsored On-Site Child Care Centers by Rachel Connelly, Deborah S. DeGraff, and Rachel A. Willis, two companies included in an approximately 1,000-strong employee survey that offered on-site nursery saved $150,000 and $250,000 per year in wages.

Moreover, employers with on-site nursery report reduced absenteeism and turnover. They are also able to recruit and retain workers they may not have otherwise been able to entice to work for them.

The most important part of education is proper training in the nursery.

Plato

Furthermore, employees were very willing to help subsidize childcare costs out of their paychecks, even those without children. They understood that on-site nursery would improve morale and productivity among workers with children. That would make the work environment generally more enjoyable for everyone. Furthermore, they were willing to help pay for on-site child care because they liked that the employer was willing to help its employees. Workers were willing to pay between $125 and $225 per year, on average, to help pay for work site child care.

On the other hand, it is true that in American society, about 27 percent of women work in blue collar jobs, and many of their employers would not consider on-site child care. Also, child care responsibilities in American society typically fall to women. Employers are also not offering health care services as often as they used to. Asking them to provide child care on-site is not likely to happen.

Perhaps a better alternative would be to provide longer maternity and paternity leave for parents. Flexible work schedules would also be a good option for many employers compared to providing on-site nursery. Nursery workers cannot take children to the doctor or care for them when they are ill, and school-aged children still require care between 3 and 6 p.m.

So, depending on a particular employer’s situation and the attitudes and financial situations of the people it hires, on-site child care may offer a good solution to labor problems like absenteeism and tardiness. Still, other employers may find similar benefits in more flexible work schedules and paid leave for both male and female new parents.

Pregnancy and a New Job

A pregnancy can be an amazing experience for many women. While pregnancy and childbirth are a very special experience for many women, they can cause some challenges when working. Many employers are unwilling to hire a pregnant female – they are worried that she will be away for months after less than half a year in her new job. Regulations forbid hiring discrimination based on pregnancy, but employers will look for ways to avoid hiring a pregnant female.

An interviewer cannot legally ask a job applicant if she is pregnant. While the first few months of pregnancy may not provide any visible signs, the second and third trimesters of a pregnancy are usually visible. An early pregnancy should not be discussed during a job interview. An employer cannot fire an employee for being pregnant. However, a visible pregnancy may lead to an applicant not being hired.

A visible pregnancy must be discussed during an interview. It’s important to let a company know that a pregnancy won’t impact one’s dedication to a company. While some jobs may require an individual to attend work every day, there are some jobs that allow one to work from home. Many jobs like marketing, programming, writing, and financial positions will allow individuals to work from their home. This can be a great way to maintain a job while one isn’t able to visit a fixed location every day.

It’s also important to maintain one’s value after a child’s birth. Many female employees will request 2-3 months off from work after a pregnancy. While an employer won’t be able to fire someone during this period, they may look for excuses to lay off a worker after she returns. A company that wants to fire an individual can find unrelated reasons to let a person go. While this practice may be morally wrong, it is legal.

I think every working mom probably feels the same thing: You go through big chunks of time where you’re just thinking, ‘This is impossible—oh, this is impossible.’ And then you just keep going and keep going, and you sort of do the impossible.
                                                                             Tina Fey

Female employees who expect to take a pregnancy leave must demonstrate their value to a company. This value can include hard work, positive relationships with coworkers, and finding novel ways to improve the business of a company. An employee who can demonstrate a positive contribution to an organization will be retained.

One should also understand the commitment and responsibility of motherhood. While it’s possible to have a successful career and motherhood, it can be difficult to manage both. It is unlikely that one will be able to reach high-level management while raising a child. Many high-level managers find that work commitments require 60-100 hours a week. This will require 10-12-hour days on a regular schedule. It may not be possible to raise a family while juggling the commitments of a high-responsibility job.

It’s important to look for a career that allows one to choose their own hours. There are many mothers who find employment as freelance writers, transcriptionists, programmers, web developers, or entrepreneurs. There are many jobs that allow workers to choose their own hours. This can be valuable when raising and nurturing a baby or child.

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