A Curriculum Vitae (CV) has to be outstanding in order to land you a job. Most applicants use a template for their CV and think it will help them get into a job. While creating a CV one has to look at things from the employers’ eyes. It is beneficial to customize a CV to suit the requirements of the employer.

There are many types of CVs such as an Entry CV, Professional CV, Executive CV, Military CV, and Career Change CV. If you are not good at CV writing it will serve your purpose to get professional CV writing help online. There are many good companies online that will write it out for you at a little cost. The good quality of writing will help you get hired. A professional CV writing service will give you a competitive edge over rivals. They are well familiar with all the hiring standards of companies and will display the qualities that the employers look for in the right candidate.

They can craft CVs for a variety of industries. All you have to do is give them your details and they will write a unique CV that is sure to get you shortlisted for the interview process. Once you meet the hiring company you will be able to talk to them face to face and prove your suitability.

The most complex type of CV to write is the career change CV. When you decide to enter another career, the employer will be reluctant to hire you because of no prior experience in the field. Comparatively, an entry level CV is simple to write but it has to have an impressive presentation to make you stand out of the crowd. Recent graduates and college leavers look to enter a good profession. The first job in their lives matters the most to them and this first job can groom their future prospects. If the CV is not written properly, they will land up at small jobs and not gain prosperity in life.

Studying the large and diversified job market helps a lot. Writing a good CV will help you market yourself better. Adding unique features will help you get noticed by the screening personnel and you will be more likely called for an interview. With an impressive CV, you can also search for jobs abroad. If you are a professional, look online at job portals for open positions and apply without hesitation. Jobs in the Middle East and Far East may be more rewarding, and it will always help to explore more opportunities in countries where there is a shortage of your skills.

Good market research will help you in your career and will move you ahead fast. You can also join the Facebook and Twitter pages of international employers to make yourself more visible. LinkedIn profiles also help you get noticed. If you find CV writing complex, get help from an online CV writing company.

Adjust Your Resume

Your resume is more than just a list of your previous jobs and experiences. Tailoring a resume to fit each different job you apply for can make a big impact on a potential employer.

Your resume should have a stated objective at the top, specific to the job you want. The objective should include a brief statement highlighting your qualifications for the job. For example, if you’re applying for a job as a staff assistant for Acme Company, your objective should read something like, “To secure a staff assistant position at Acme Company, drawing on solid office management skills.”

Like the objective, the job experience you list should pertain specifically to the job you are trying to get. Every job has multiple duties, and by placing more emphasis on the duties that are relevant to the position you’re seeking, you will come across as more qualified for the job. For example, if you’re considering a job as a sales clerk in a clothing store and one of the positions on your resume is a waitress job at a restaurant, don’t focus on the skills of waiting tables. Rather, focus on the people skills you honed at that job, such as “Interacted with customers to provide a pleasant dining experience,” or “Helped diners choose what to order by describing the food in a straightforward, descriptive manner.” These statements focus on your interactions with the customers. If you’re applying for a bartending job, you can frame that same experience in a different way, such as “Waited on multiple tables at the same time while ensuring all diners were satisfied with the service,” showing that you can multi-task and handle more than one order at a time.

If you have a great deal of experience in many different fields, it’s okay to leave some jobs off your resume as long as these omissions don’t leave a large gap of time that makes it appear that you were unemployed for that time. For example, if you worked as a teacher during the day and as a telemarketer at night, and you’re applying for a teaching job, you can leave the telemarketing job off since it’s irrelevant to teaching and won’t leave a time gap. The key is to provide your potential employer with as much relevant information as possible, without overloading the resume to the point where it’s watered down.

The main point to remember is that you want each potential employer to feel like you have really done your research and you know exactly what you want in a job. Tailor each resume to the specific employer, and you will find that you end up with more interviews and job offers than you would sending a general, vague resume to those employers.

Video Resumes: The Future of Resumes?

In tough economic times, the job market is slim, and competition is fierce. Prospective job hunters try everything from overhauling their resumes to taking educational classes to make themselves more attractive to hiring managers. Now there is another tool they can use: a video resume. Not only are they useful, they are becoming more and more popular with both job seekers and employers.

A video resume is a video made by an applicant that is usually uploaded to the internet for a potential employer to review. It is intended to complement a written resume, although some people use the video by itself when presenting themselves to a potential employer. It offers a visual way for a candidate to describe their skills and experience. Once considered pretentious and tedious, video resumes are more widely used than ever thanks to advances technology such as streaming video through the internet.

According to an annual survey of employers conducted by Vault Incorporated, “89% of employers revealed that they would watch a video resume if it were submitted to them.” A video resume can do much more than work together with a paper resume. It gives potential employers a chance to evaluate a candidate’s image, disposition and behavior. This is an excellent selling point for a savvy professional.

There are other good reasons for creating a video resume. Job seekers have a potential edge by showing themselves to a company. Depending on the kind of job the person is looking for, a video resume offers an opportunity to be creative. They do not have to be elaborate and don’t require lots of expensive equipment to make. They have the ability to generate interest quickly and make a hiring manager want to learn more about the candidate, possibly leading to an interview. And for those seeking jobs in fashion, entertainment or media, it is a perfect way to showcase essential skills.

Although there are a number of positive points for creating a video resume, there are criticisms of it as well. Some employers and recruiters don’t believe a visual resume alone is a sufficient representation of an applicant’s background and skills. They are time-consuming to review and do not allow for an equal comparison between two candidates. Because a candidate has time to prepare for the video beforehand, they could be following a script that does not give an accurate or truthful representation of themselves. Another area of criticism is that a video resume can create racial, age or gender bias before the candidate has a chance to present their qualifications. It could also be used as the basis for a discrimination lawsuit if a candidate is not chosen for the job.

I want to look back on my career and be proud of the work, and be proud that I tried everything.

Jon Stewart

Despite these shortcomings, video resumes are considered “hot technology” by many recruiters. Since 2007 when they first began to be used, video resumes may well have caused a revolution in the job-hunting process and become a mainstream part of the employment world. Several employment websites already exist for people to post video resumes on, such as Resume Video. Job seekers create a video with them using Resume Video’s technology and then create a website that features their video, a written resume and contact information. The video resume can also be sent out and posted to other places on the internet. Another popular video resume site is HireVue. This company has trademarked the “Digital Interview Platform,” a revolutionary way to create online job interview guides. Employers can use this to easily watch select candidate interviews and share them with managers and evaluation teams.

Some devoted employment hunters have capitalized on the popularity of YouTube to get their message out. YouTube is easily the most widely-used video site in the world, hosting millions of videos with thousands of new ones added every day. Currently, there are lots of resume videos on YouTube. Some were created by businesses or individuals to help others create a video resume. Others are actual resumes from people seeking employment. It is a valuable resource for someone who is considering making their own video resume and an excellent example of how times are changing with technology.

A search on “video resumes” shows many recruiters in the results, advocating video resumes and interviews as the future of hiring. Candidates are urged to rethink their old traditional methods of submitting a paper resume and cover letter and supplementing or replacing them with a video. With more first interviews being conducted by webcam than ever, interviewing and hiring processes keep turning towards social media. Technology is constantly changing, but it is definitely here to stay. So where does all this leave video resumes? On the ladder of job search tools, they are definitely on the way to the top.